Slimmed down immutable infrastructure

Last weekend we had a hackathon at Diabol. The topics somehow related to DevOps and Continuous Delivery. My group of four focused on slim microservices with immutable infrastructure. Since we believe in automated delivery pipelines for software development and infrastructure setup, the next natural step would be to merge these two together. Ideally, one would produce a machine image that contains everything needed to run the current application. The servers would be immutable, since we don’t want anyone doing manual changes to a running environment. Rather, the changes should be checked in to version control and a new server would be created based on the automated build pipeline for the infrastructure.

The problem with traditional machine images running on e.g. VMware or Amazon is that they tend to very large in size, a couple of gigabytes is not an unusual size. Images of that size become cumbersome to work with as they take a long time to create and ship over a network. Therefore it is desirable to keep server images as small as possible, especially since you might create and tear down servers ad-hoc for e.g. test purposes in your delivery pipeline. Linux is a very common server operating system but many Linux distributions are shipped with features that we are very unlikely to ever be using on a server, such as C compilers or utility programs. But since we adopt immutable servers, we don’t even need things as editors, man pages or even ssh!

Docker is an interesting solution for slimmed down infrastructure and full stack machine images which we evaluated during the hackathon. After getting our hands dirty after a couple of hours, we were quite pleased with its capabilities. We’ll definitely keep it on our radar and continue with our evaluation of it.

Since we’re mostly operating in the Java space, I also spent some time looking at how we could save some size on our machine images by potentially slimming down the JVM. Since a delivery pipeline will be triggered several times a day to deploy, test etc, every megabyte saved will increase the pipeline throughput. But why should you slim down the JVM? Well the JVM also contains features (or libraries) that are highly unlikely to ever be used on a server, such as audio, the awt and Swing UI frameworks, JavaFX, fonts, cursor images etc. The standard installation of the Java 8 JRE is around 150 MB. It didn’t take long to shave off a third of that size by removing libraries such as the aforementioned ones. Unfortunately the core library of Java, rt.jar is 66 MB of size, which is a constraint for the minimal possible size of a working JVM (unless you start removing the class files inside it too). Without too much work, I was able to safely remove a third of the size of the standard JRE installation, landing on a bit under 100 MB of size and still run our application. Although this practice might not be suitable for production use of technical or even legal reasons, it’s still interesting to see how much we typically install on our severs although it’ll never be used. The much anticipated project Jigsaw which will introduce modularity to Java SE has been postponed several times. Hopefully it can be incorporated into Java 9, enabling us to decide which modules we actually want to use for our particular use case.

Our conclusion for the time spent on this topic during the hackathon is that Docker is an interesting alternative to traditional machine image solutions, which not only allows, but also encourages slim servers and immutable infrastructure.

Tommy Tynjä
@tommysdk

One thought on “Slimmed down immutable infrastructure”

  1. There is also slimming to be done on other parts of the Java web application stack. Micro services is a concept that is talked about a lot. You should ask yourself whether you actually use or need the full J2EE Web features for all of your services. Do you use JSPs? Could you even have a servlet less web app with just a slim library that talks plain HTTP.

    We looked at Dropwizard as a way to realize this. Looks good.

Comments are closed.