JavaOne Latin America summary

Last week I attended the JavaOne Latin America software development conference in São Paulo, Brazil. This was a joint event with Oracle Open World, a conference with focus on Oracle solutions. I was accepted as a speaker for the Java, DevOps and Methodologies track at JavaOne. This article intends to give a summary of my main takeaways from the event.

The main points Oracle made during the opening keynote of Oracle Open World was their commitment to cloud technology. Oracle CEO Mark Hurd made the prediction that in 10 years, most production workloads will be running in the cloud. Oracle currently engineers all of their solutions for the cloud, which is something that also their on-premise solutions can leverage from. Security is a very important aspect in all of their solutions. Quite a few sessions during JavaOne showcased Java applications running on Oracles cloud platform.

The JavaOne opening keynote demonstrated the Java flight recorder, which enables you to profile your applications with near zero overhead. The aim of the flight recorder is to have as minimal overhead as possible so it can be enabled in production systems by default. It has a user interface which provides valuable data in case you want to get an understanding of how your Java applications perform.

The next version of Java, Java 9, will feature long awaited modularity through project Jigsaw. Today, all of your public APIs in your source code packages are exposed and can be used by anyone who has access to the classes. With Jigsaw, you as a developer can decide which classes are exported and exposed. This gives you as a developer more control over what are internal APIs and what are intended for use. This was quickly demonstrated on stage. You will also have the possibility to decide what your application dependencies are within the JDK. For instance it is quite unlikely that you need e.g. UI related libraries such as Swing or audio if you develop back-end software. I once tried to dissect the Java rt.jar for this particular purpose (just for fun), so it is nice to finally see this becoming a reality. The keynote also mentioned project Valhalla (e.g. value types for classes) and project Panama but at this date it is still uncertain if they will be included in Java 9.

Mark Heckler from Pivotal had an interesting session on the Spring framework and their Spring cloud projects. Pivotal works closely with Netflix, which is a known open source contributor and one of the industry leaders when it comes to developing and using new technologies. However, since Netflix is committed to run their applications on AWS, Spring cloud aims to make use of Netflix work to create portable solutions for a wider community by introducing appropriate abstraction layers. This enables Spring cloud users to avoid changing their code if there is a need to change the underlying technology. Spring cloud has support for Netflix tools such as Eureka, Ribbon, Zuul, Hystrix among others.

Arquillian, by many considered the best integration testing framework for Java EE projects, was dedicated a full one hour session at the event. As a long time contributor to project, it was nice to see a presentation about it and how its Cube extension can make use of Docker containers to execute your tests against.

One interesting session was a non-technical one, also given by Mark Heckler, which focused on financial equations and what factors drives business decisions. The purpose was to give an understanding of how businesses calculate paybacks and return on investments and when and why it makes sense for a company to invest in new technology. For instance the payback period for an initiative should be as short as possible, preferably less than a year. The presentation also covered net present values and quantification’s. Transforming a monolithic architecture to a microservice style approach was the example used for the calculations. The average cadence for releases of key monolithic applications in our industry is just one release per year. Which in many cases is even optimistic! Compare these numbers with Amazon, who have developed their applications with a microservice architecture since 2011. Their average release cadence is 7448 times a day, which means that they perform a production release once every 11.6s! This presentation certainly laid a good foundation for my own session on continuous delivery.

Then it was finally time for my presentation! When I arrived 10 minutes before the talk there was already a long line outside of the room and it filled up nicely. In my presentation, The Road to Continuous Delivery, I talked about how a Swedish company revamped its organization to implement a completely new distributed system running on the Java platform and using continuous delivery ways of working. I started with a quick poll of how many in the room were able to perform production releases every day and I was apparently the only one. So I’m glad that there was a lot of interest for this topic at the conference! If you are interested in having me presenting this or another talk on the topic at your company or at an event, please contact me! It was great fun to give this presentation and I got some good questions and interesting discussions afterwards. You can find the slides for my presentation here.

Java Virtual Machine (JVM) architect Mikael Vidstedt had an interesting presentation about JVM insights. It is apparently not uncommon that the vast majority of the Java heap footprint is taken up by String objects (25-50% not uncommon) and many of them have the same value. JDK 8 however introduced an important JVM improvement to address this memory footprint concern (through string deduplication) in their G1 garbage collector improvement effort.

I was positively surprised that many sessions where quite non-technical. A few sessions talked about possibilities with the Raspberry Pi embedded device, but there was also a couple of presentations that touched on software development in a broader sense. I think it is good and important for conferences of this size to have such a good balance in content.

All in all I thought it was a good event. Both JavaOne and Oracle Open World combined for around 1300 attendees and a big exhibition hall. JavaOne was multi-track, but most sessions were in Portuguese. However, there was usually one track dedicated to English speaking sessions but it obviously limited the available content somewhat for non-Portuguese speaking attendees. An interesting feature was that the sessions held in English were live translated to Portuguese to those who lent headphones for that purpose.

The best part of the conference was that I got to meet a lot of people from many different countries. It is great fun to meet colleagues from all around the world that shares my enthusiasm and passion for software development. The strive for making this industry better continues!

Tommy Tynjä
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